After numerous delays, the Guerguagui people of Chad have finally received the New Testament in their language, Guerguiko*. Community members dedicated their New Testament on Dec. 28 at an event in Moukoulou, in the Guera province of Chad.

The dedication had been delayed on several occasions and only just avoided another lockdown in Chad’s capital, N’Djamena, that began in January, but the persistence and patience of the Guerguagui people has finally been rewarded.

For the Guerguiko-speaking community, finally being able to handle the printed New Testament is a joyful—and literally “hands-on”—moment.

“Today, the dedication of the New Testament gives me great joy,” said Rateigna Terap, a member of the Guerguiko translation team.

Translation work first began on the New Testament 28 years ago. Although the printed New Testaments arrived in Chad at the beginning of 2020, a series of events—including the current pandemic—caused the dedication and distribution launch to be delayed.

The event was attended by nearly 2,000 people and included singing, dancing, speeches, presentations and food. Highlights included the singing of some new Scripture-based songs by the choirs, and public readings from the Guerguiko New Testament. Several hundred copies of the printed version were sold, and the app version was also available for those with smartphones.

*According to the Ethnologue database, the language has been known as Mukulu, but that name properly designates only the principal village in the language group and its speech.

Source: wycliffe.org.uk