Linking the Canadian Church with the world's minority language groups, to see community transformation through Bible translation, use of translated Scriptures, mother-tongue literacy and education.
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Where We Work

Wycliffe is a global organization serving language groups worldwide.

Click on continents and countries to learn how Bible translation is progressing. Highlighted countries indicate areas where personnel from Wycliffe Canada are serving, or where we're helping fund translation or other language-related projects.

Where We Work

Europe

  • The Church established around A.D. 50, after the Apostle Paul visited Macedonia.
  • In the 14th century, England’s John Wycliffe began translating Scripture from Latin into English.
  • The Protestant movement was closely tied to having the Bible available in common languages.
  • Today, translation work is in progress for the many European sign languages as well as language groups that have immigrated to Europe, including a number of Romani (“Gypsy”) languages.
  • Bible translation still needed for millions of displaced people who have settled in Europe.

South America

The Americas
  • More than 984 languages and countless diverse cultures and ethnic groups – this is the "New World," the colourful collage known as the Americas.
  • Indigenous peoples still account for about 51 million of the more than 925 million people living in North, Central and South America and the Caribbean. Many indigenous groups, of all sizes and with varying levels of contact with majority-language populations, have maintained their mother tongues – languages completely different from those dominant all around them.
  • Bible translation is closer to completion here than in any other region in the world. About 300 language projects are completed! Work is now progressing in over 300 languages, mostly in Mexico, Brazil and Peru. About 149 others have been assessed and are waiting for translation to begin.
  • Around 55 other languages, with the largest concentrations in Brazil and other countries of South America, still need to be surveyed to determine the translation need.

Asia

  • More than 50% of the world’s population (approximately four billion people).
  • Birthplace of most of the world’s dominant religions and ideals: Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Taoism, Buddhism, Shintoism and Confucianism.
  • Accounts for nearly one-third of the world’s languages and about 40% of the remaining needs for Bible translation.
  • Despite widespread restrictions to religious freedom and persecution of Christians, the Church is growing at an exponential rate.
  • The Church in Asia is a key player in the global effort to take God’s Word to the unreached on the Asian continent and around the globe.

The Pacific

  • Area: 8,515,800 sq km
  •  25,000 islands scattered over 88 million sq km of ocean; this is larger than the combined areas of Africa, Asia and Europe
  • Comprised of one continent (Australia), two large land masses (New Zealand and Papua New Guinea [PNG]) and 26 smaller island states and territories
  • Population: 35,838,336    
  • Languages: 1,250

Africa

  • Second-largest continent in size and population, and home to 30% of the world’s languages.
  • Some 46% of Africans identify themselves as Christians.
  • 800-plus language groups with translation needs; 700 of those are in Nigeria and the French-speaking areas of central Africa.
  • The African Church is taking on greater responsibility for Bible translation, language development work, literacy, discipleship and evangelism.
  • In partnership with Bible agencies, the Church is beginning to address community development needs, the HIV/AIDS crisis, justice, health and education.

North America

The Americas

  • More than 984 languages and countless diverse cultures and ethnic groups – this is the "New World," the colourful collage known as the Americas.
  • Indigenous peoples still account for about 51 million of the more than 925 million people living in North, Central and South America and the Caribbean. Many indigenous groups, of all sizes and with varying levels of contact with majority-language populations, have maintained their mother tongues – languages completely different from those dominant all around them.
  • Bible translation is closer to completion here than in any other region in the world. About 300 language projects are completed! Work is now progressing in over 300 languages, mostly in Mexico, Brazil and Peru. About 149 others have been assessed and are waiting for translation to begin.
  • Around 55 other languages, with the largest concentrations in Brazil and other countries of South America, still need to be surveyed to determine the translation need.