WordAlive Now

A New Weapon

By Samuel Ko | Oct 5, 2018

In times past, the Binumarien people of Papua New Guinea would paint their faces with black ashes, wear pig teeth necklaces, and even put pigs teeth in their mouths when going to war with other tribes. Many also carried string…

The Vision Turns 100

By Roy Eyre | Oct 4, 2018

August 30 is an important date in the history of Bible translation. That date in 2018 marked 100 years since Cameron Townsend first began to form the vision that would catalyze exponential growth in the rate of Bible translation (see…

Aiming at a Moving Target

By Jack Popjes | Oct 4, 2018

Nearly 60 years ago I read a book written by some Wycliffe Bible translators called Two-Thousand Tongues to Go. No one back in the late 1950s had any idea that there were more than 7,000 languages spoken in the world, most of…

Consuming Passion

By Samuel Ko | Jul 20, 2018

Betty Amon remembers sitting with her family during family devotions, reading the Bible in Pohnpeian, one of Micronesia’s major languages. She could read the words aloud, but she didn’t have the faintest idea what they meant.

a map of the world

Wycliffe Germany launches refugee-related website

By Samuel Ko | Jul 19, 2018

Europe’s large influx of refugees has prompted Wycliffe Germany to launch a Scripture resource website called new-neighbour-bible.org. 

a map of the world

Growing with “the gizmo”

By Samuel Ko | Jul 19, 2018

Workers with AIDIA, Wycliffe Canada’s partner organization in Peru, were surprised when they visited the community of Pacayura, site of a newly planted church.

Becoming Women of the Bible

By Samuel Ko | Mar 16, 2018

The ladies’ meetings in the local church were boring. One young lady wondered why…

“One Crazy Gringo”

By Samuel Ko | Mar 16, 2018

Wycliffe founder William Cameron Townsend faced the future with openness, spontaneity and creativity. He was an explorer who chose not to follow existing models, but forthrightly forged ahead, believing God was guiding his dreams.

Jesus Speaks Sirmar

By Samuel Ko | Mar 16, 2018

It’s easy to imagine Bible translation as simply exchanging one set of words for another, but it is so much more than that. Situating translated Scripture in the cultural context is critically important.